New Videos

22 01 2014

William Carroll: Alternative Policy Groups and Global Civil Society – Networks and Discourses of Counter-Hegemony
Presented at the GSA Conference, University of Victoria, May 6, 2012


Jerry Harris: Dystopia and Democracy – Power and the Transnational Capitalist Class
Presented at the GSA Conference, University of Victoria, May 6, 2012





New Content from Our Contributors

17 12 2013

By Chen Shuoying

Abstract of New Book: New Mode of Capitalist Production Organization–Research on Modularity Production Network

After two hundred years’ development, the capitalist production mode evolves into a new shape–network economy. The traditional mode of production features the vertical control of final product producers, while the new global production network allocates resource effectively around product standards on a global scale, forming modular production and composition under the control of standards. READ THE ENTIRE ABSTRACT >>

Book Review on Michael Hudson’s “Super Imperialism

First published in 1972 – one year after gold was demonetized – and updated thirty years later, in 2002, Michael Hudson’s Super Imperialism is the first book to recognize the policy of monetary imperialism consciously pursued by the U.S government for exploiting the world. Together with Henry C.K. Liu, well known for his book “The Financial War Between China and the U.S.,” they have published a series of works on dollar hegemony in opposition to the Chicago School’s monetarist ideas. READ THE BOOK REVIEW  >>





Evidence of a transnational capitalist class-for-itself: the determinants of PAC activity among foreign firms in the Global Fortune 500, 2000–2006

21 09 2013

By JOSHUA MURRAY
Department of Sociology, Vanderbilt University

Read the paper >>





Forthcoming Edited Volume from NCSGC: Global Capitalism in Asia and Oceania

20 08 2013

We are currently working on putting together an edited volume (tentatively titled: Global Capitalism in Asia and Oceania) that will include mostly papers given at our conference this year at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia. Stay tuned for more information

.

Above: photo from our July conference at Griffith University. This was the 2nd conference of NCSGC.





CFP for Turkey’s ATILIM Social Sciences Journal

24 01 2013

CALL FOR PAPERS

For a Special Issue on

“GLOBAL CAPITALISM AD CRISIS: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES”

The beginning of the 1990s seemed to have ushered in an era of newfound optimism. History had witnessed, in the space of a few short years, momentous developments that were changing the face of the world. The Berlin Wall was down, and the collapse of the Soviet Union and the Eastern Bloc had made the “Communist threat” a thing of the past. This was the end of the bureaucratic state. “Victory” was the Free World’s. The winds of change were blowing; a new wave of hope and exuberance seemed to be washing over the globe, bringing the ahistorical optimism of liberalism’s free market to every corner. Such powerful global governance institutions as the IMF, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization were enjoying a resurgence in prestige, and the world certainly did seem as if it were being cut down to size with the reform and structural adjustment programs these institutions were overseeing throughout the vast and undeveloped South. That the world had become a smaller, more accessible place was attested to by the opening of national borders to the “free” movement of capital and goods, with the hype surrounding the so-called “miracle” states being lanced as models of successful integration into globalizing markets, and with technical innovations in the media, communications, and information technologies industries that were said to be, more than at any other time, transforming the world into a “global village”. Understanding globalization had become the order of the day, and referring to the benefits of a globalizing world a requisite in interpreting current events. To question the globalization process was nothing less than foolhardy. The victory of this free market understanding and of international capitalism was celebrated as the end of history.

Read the rest of this entry »





UPDATE: June 28-29 Conference Venue, Travel, and Accommodation Details

20 11 2012

CALL FOR PAPERS: Global Capitalism in Asia and Oceania

Griffith University | The Ship Inn Conference Centre
Corner Stanley & Sidon Streets
Southbank Parklands, Brisbane, Australia
June 28-29, 2013

printer-iconPrint the Network for Critical Study of Global Capitalism Conference Flyer

Outside of Asia, much is made of ‘the Asian Century’, the ‘rise of Asia’, the economic potential of Asian markets, regional trade agreements with Asia, and building ‘Asia-relevant’ capabilities to support all these. Such instrumental views are shaping the ideological landscape of many parts of the ‘West’. For those from within and outside Asia who are interested in critical studies of global capitalism other topics are much more pressing. These include the different models and manifestations of global capitalism that are being adopted across Asia, as well as the links between such models and ongoing political developments in the region. Questions arise about the implications of newly energized “Asian capitalism” for current economic and social relationships—about current forms of economic division and exploitation, increasing social polarization and state based authoritarianism. Related questions also come up about oppositional activist practices that are arising and contemporary modes of policing such dissent. The purpose of this conference is to focus critical studies of global capitalism on Asia, Australia, and the Oceania region, to provide opportunities for interested scholars and activists to explore related issues. READ MORE >>

SEE OUR CONFERENCE PAGE FOR MORE DETAILS >>





Global markets are the new battlefields

20 11 2012

By Kanishka Jayasuriya

The rise of China and its ramifications for our relationship with the US has created angst within Australia’s foreign and defence policy community.

Much of this tortured reflection is really a zombie debate where outmoded geo-political terms such as ‘power transition’ are deployed to understand new patterns of international politics in a globally integrated economy. Read more >>








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