Global Capitalism, Neoliberalism, & The Making of a Transnationally Oriented State Apparatus in Iraq

25 03 2016

Read here the new research paper by NCSGC contributor Yousef Baker.  

ABSTRACT:    The 2003 invasion of Iraq and its subsequent occupation effectively erased the country’s existing political and economic system, turning Iraq into a tabula rasa. The initial invasion of Iraq, beyond geo-political and other conjunctural explanations, and at a more explanatory structural level, was a response by the United States to transnational crises of overaccumulation. One of the central goals of invading Iraq was to more fully integrate the country into the global capitalist system. The occupation regime attempted to formally integrate Iraq into the global economy by imposing a hyper neoliberal legal framework and policies that effectively transnationalized the Iraqi state and facilitated the development of new transnational accumulation circuits in Iraq. This article details this by analyzing the 112 laws that were imposed by the American occupation in Iraq as well as the permanent constitution that was passed in 2005. It shows that these laws opened Iraq to investors irrespective of its national origins. It concludes that this is evidence of the U.S. acting on behalf of transnational, rather than national economic interests.

oil-no-bid-contracts





Global Capitalism and Transnational Class Formation in Asia and Oceania

8 02 2016

[Updated/article version of the introduction to the new book Globalization and Transnational Capitalism in Asia and Oceania]

By: Jeb Sprague

News headlines warn of rivalries and competition between nations across Asia and the Pacific, even as powerful, cross-border relations form on an unprecedented scale. This article looks at the reality behind this façade of nation-state competition, examining the new forms of social, economic, and political integration and conflict fostered by a global capitalist system rife with contradictions, inequalities, and crises. We move beyond traditional conceptualizations of the interstate system, with its nation-state competition as the core organizing principle of the world economy, and the institutional framework in which global social forces operate. In this paper I will look at the important studies that have examined and debated over how there is a growing transnationality of material (economic) relations in the global era, as well as an emerging transnationality of many social and class relations. I will look in particular at how such studies have taken into consideration social formation in regions of Asia and Oceania.[i] To what degree are transnational processes taking place? How do transnational capitalist-class fractions, new middle strata, and labor undergird capitalist globalization in Asia and Oceania? These social classes are relationships generated and reproduced through the productive processes and economic life of a type of society (or what Marx referred to as a “mode of production”). As components of a society, these classes contain individuals who are carriers of productive relationships. So in the present global/transnational phase of world capitalism, how do state and institutional apparatuses connect to these shifting social and class relations? How do local/national and international processes clash or link with transnational processes?

For the purposes of this paper, it is important to first emphasize the difference between national, international, and transnational processes. Whereas national processes occur within the frontiers of the nation-state, international processes occur across borders. Transnational processes, while occurring across borders, also take place through functional integration. Functional integration refers to how amalgamations of different components (or agents) are constituted through their joint-operation. Processes that take place across frontiers in this integrated manner alter the very ways in which space and geography are implicated in material and social production. Political economists in recent years, for instance, have shown how transnationally oriented class relations have developed through the shift from the international phase of world capitalism to the global phase of world capitalism (Carroll, 2010; Harris, 2006; Liodakis, 2010; Robinson, 2004, 2014; Sklair 2001). This transition has occurred as earlier indicative planning (with a view to foment national economy development) has fragmented and as markets have become integrated into new transnational circuits of accumulation. Read the rest of this entry »





Reform Is Not Enough to Stem the Rising Tide of Inequality Worldwide

7 02 2016

By: William I. Robinson

We are nearing 2016, the year when the richest 1 percent of humanity will own more than the rest of the world, according to proje2016_0101r_ctions made by the nongovernmental organization Oxfam.

This is up from the 1 percent owning 44 percent of the world’s wealth in 2010 and 48 percent in 2014. If current trends continue, the 1 percent will own 54 percent by 2020.

The top 80 billionaires were worth $1.9 trillion in 2014, an amount equal to the bottom 50 percent. These 80 billionaires saw a 50 percent rise in their wealth in just four years, from 2010 to 2014, during which time the poorest 50 percent saw a drop in their wealth. In other words, there has been a huge transfer of wealth in a very short period of time from the poorest half of humanity to the richest 80 individuals on the planet.  READ THE ENTIRE PIECE HERE ON TRUTH-OUT





Talk on TCC by Dr. Peter Phillips

7 02 2016

Listen here for a talk by Professor Peter Phillips on the transnational capitalist class (TCC) in the context of today’s global society, politics, and imperialism.





New Book: Globalization and Transnational Capitalism in Asia and Oceania

23 01 2016

Please request that your library purchase a copy of this new volume published with chapters by participants in our network.

 These important studies examine and debate over how there is a growing transnationality of material (economic) relations in the global era, as well as an emerging transnationality of many social and class relations. How does transnational capitalist class fractions, new middle strata, and labor undergird globalization in Asia and Oceania? How have states and institutions become entwined with such processes? This book provides insight into a field of dynamic change.

It looks in particular at how these processes are playing out in Australia, China, India, Laos, Japan, Papua New Guinea and regionally. The introductory chapter is available to read here.

Jeb Sprague





Third Bi-Annual Conference Announcement

8 04 2015

Social Movements and Conflicts in the Global Era

Prague,  September 26 – 27, 2015
Academic Conference Centre
Husova 4a, Prague 1, Czech Republic

The conference is hosted by the Centre of Global Studies in Prague (CGS), and co-organized by the Global Studies Association of North America (GSA NA) and Global Studies Association UK.

Featuring:

Leslie Sklair (London School of Economics) speaking on “Global Capitalism and Transnational Capitalist Class Theory.” Sklair is a world renowned social theorist, and author of the groundbreaking The Transnational Capitalist Class.

Beltrán Roca (University of Sevilla) has published more than 50 works on collective action, trade unionism and the third sector. He has combined his academic career with an intense political engagement in radical unions and autonomous social movements. He is currently a member of “Levantemos El Puerto”, an instrument of local social movements that participates in the institutional arena. Since the 2015 local elections Levantemos El Puerto is governing the city of El Puerto alongside a coalition of left parties. Roca will be speaking on “Social protest and political cycles in Spain: Opportunities and Challenges.”

SOCIAL MOVEMENTS vs NEO LIBERAL CAPITALISM PANEL

1. Social Mobilization and Dignity

Tova Benski, Professor of Social Sciences, Coleman Institute, Tel Aviv, Israel, president of RC 48 social movements and collective behavior of the International Sociological Association.

2. From Legitimation Crises to Movements to Power

Lauren Langman, Professor of Sociology, Loyola University of Chicago, board member of RC 48, founding member and board member of Globalization Research Section of International Sociological Association, board member Global Studies Association.

3. Alter Globalization

Geoffrey Pleyers, FNRS-Université de Louvain, President. RC 47 social classes and social movements, International Sociological Association

Abstracts on all topics touching on global capitalism should be sent to Marek Hrubec (CGS) at: marek.hrubec@gmail.com and Jerry Harris: gharris234@comcast.net (GSA NA).

REGISTER NOW:

Fully-Employed: US$100.00
Students, Unemployed: US$30.00

PayPal registration is organized by GSA NA. To register go to:

http://www.net4dem.org/mayglobal/GlobalCapitalismRegistration2015.htm

RECOMMENDED HOTEL:

Hotel Belvedere Prague is located near the city centre with an attractive location of Prague 7 next to the National Gallery. It takes only 15 minutes to the Academic Conference Centre where the conference takes place (Husova 4a, Prague 1). The International Airport Ruzyne is situated 12 km away. In the walking distance, there are two central parks (Letenske sady, and Stromovka). The park Letenske sady is popular place for meetings, especially for its wonderful panoramatic view of Prague, mainly Vltava River, Charles Bridge, Prague Castle, and the historical centre of Prague.

In your email to Hotel Belveder, you should mention that you plan to attend the conference of the Centre of Global Studies, Prague, and that the price was fixed at about 60 Euro.

Hotel Belvedere Prague
Milady Horakove 19
170 00 Prague 7
Czech Republic

Email: belvedere@hhotels.cz
Bookings: booking@hhotels.cz
Website: http://www.hotelbelvedereprague.cz/





William I. Robinson:  teleSUR Interview 

8 04 2015

An interview with William I. Robinson, professor of sociology at UC Santa Barbara and author of Latin America and Global Capitalism. We talk to him about the VII Summit of the Americas and the historical, economic, and political context it which it takes place. Watch the video >>








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