CFP for Turkey’s ATILIM Social Sciences Journal

24 01 2013

CALL FOR PAPERS

For a Special Issue on

“GLOBAL CAPITALISM AD CRISIS: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES”

The beginning of the 1990s seemed to have ushered in an era of newfound optimism. History had witnessed, in the space of a few short years, momentous developments that were changing the face of the world. The Berlin Wall was down, and the collapse of the Soviet Union and the Eastern Bloc had made the “Communist threat” a thing of the past. This was the end of the bureaucratic state. “Victory” was the Free World’s. The winds of change were blowing; a new wave of hope and exuberance seemed to be washing over the globe, bringing the ahistorical optimism of liberalism’s free market to every corner. Such powerful global governance institutions as the IMF, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization were enjoying a resurgence in prestige, and the world certainly did seem as if it were being cut down to size with the reform and structural adjustment programs these institutions were overseeing throughout the vast and undeveloped South. That the world had become a smaller, more accessible place was attested to by the opening of national borders to the “free” movement of capital and goods, with the hype surrounding the so-called “miracle” states being lanced as models of successful integration into globalizing markets, and with technical innovations in the media, communications, and information technologies industries that were said to be, more than at any other time, transforming the world into a “global village”. Understanding globalization had become the order of the day, and referring to the benefits of a globalizing world a requisite in interpreting current events. To question the globalization process was nothing less than foolhardy. The victory of this free market understanding and of international capitalism was celebrated as the end of history.

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